Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A Real American Hero

OSU Marching Band Does Classic Rock



When Ohio State played Rutgers on Saturday, TBDBITL marched and gave us a tribute to classic rock. The complicated formations include a musician smashing a guitar onstage. Honestly, I don’t post the Ohio State Marching Band’s halftime show every week, just when it’s awesome. (via Uproxx)

Miss Cellania's Links

The Great Diamond Hoax of 1872. Greed, pride, and some other deadly sins combined to convince prominent men that their ship had come in.

Fake deaths, cheap resurrections, and dealing with real grief. Those who have confronted death find the pop culture version altogether unrealistic.

This Is What It’s Like To Live In An Ebola-Quarantined Apartment Building. Two guys in Dallas give a firsthand account.

A $150 Pair Of Sneakers Taught Me A Lesson That's Lasted 22 Years. Better to make those money mistakes when you’re still young enough to recover from them.

38 Facts on Frankenstein (Including the Aerosmith song it inspired and the reason the Munsters never got sued).

What the World Eats. National Geographic brings us a data visualization project that breaks down world food consumption.

Things I wish I knew when I started my PhD…

The Uncanny Language of Medical Instagram. An app for medical professionals provides horror, information, and entertainment. 

America’s Favorite Sandwich Fillings.

A science professor explains why men and women have the same number of ribs, despite Adam having one removed to create Eve. (via Metafilter)

If I Had Known My Mother Back Then. Graphic artist Danielle Delph combed through old family photographs and combined some from her childhood with those of her mother’s childhood.  (via mental_floss)

Amityville Pet Shelter

(via Fark)

Marcel the Shell (With Shoes On)



Marcel the Shell was a viral sensation in 2009 and 2011. Now he's back with a third video, in which he gives a nonsensical but adorable interview. Created by Jennie Slate, Marcel's new book is out. (via Time)

Monday, October 20, 2014

Prisencolinensinainciusol



The song is called Prisencolinensinainciusol, written by Italian artist Adriano Celentano in 1972. Recorded by Celentano and Claudia Mori in an American accent, it sounds like it should be English, but the lyrics are pure gibberish. The accompaniment is by Celentano’s wife Claudia Mori, although actress Raffaella CarrĂ  lip-syncs it in the video. Celentano said,
"Ever since I started singing, I was very influenced by American music and everything Americans did. So at a certain point, because I like American slang — which, for a singer, is much easier to sing than Italian — I thought that I would write a song which would only have as its theme the inability to communicate. And to do this, I had to write a song where the lyrics didn't mean anything."
This video caused a sensation when I posted it in October of 2009; too bad all the links to it were borked when I moved from Squarespace to Blogger. (Squarespace export files do not translate to Blogger, so I have tons of material that may never get back on my site.) In 2012, Adriano Celentano released a 9-minute remix of the song and video for a new audience. You can see that one here. The song contains a lot of filler, but you get to see the extended beginning skit as it was shown on TV.

Energy Equation

(via reddit)

Working with Cats Around



Working at home is wonderful, but it has its drawbacks. My kids have been on fall break this past week, which makes getting anything done difficult. However, they did clean up the house. The cats won’t do that. They just want your undivided attention while you’re home with them. Cole and Marmalade demonstrate exactly what working around cats is like. At least I’m in a position to put all the cats outside when they get too annoying. (via Fark

Headgear

Fiddling

Middle East Translators



John Oliver looks at the dangers of being a translator for the U.S. military if you live in Afghanistan or Iraq. You’d be lucky to make it out alive. It reminds me of a certain Southeast Asian country we were involved in in the 1960s, except that worked much better than this time around. 

Miss Cellania's Links

Houdini's Greatest Trick. How the magician debunked the seance shenanigans of spiritualist medium Mina Crandon.

The Evans Family is Living in This World. It wasn’t always that way. (via Metafilter)

Is sex only for rich people? You’d think so by examining our policies.

Can You Guess These Horror Movie Houses? Or maybe you were too busy screaming to take notice of the architecture.

Deadly Destinations Around the World. There’s a booming business in serving adrenaline-junkie tourists with a death wish.

10 True Stories of Survival Cannibalism. Consuming corpses is a desperate measure, but most of these cases stop short of murder.

The Women Who Shaped The Computer Age. Women were founding software companies before they could open bank accounts in their own names.

Bizarre Sea Creature Caught In Singapore Looks Like Kraken Come To Life. It’s a relative of the star fish, with tentacles that grow like fractals.

A Real Life Cave of Death. Twice, someone visited Kenya's Kitum Cave and came out with the Marburg virus, which is deadlier than Ebola.

Inside the rise of embryo adoption. In vitro fertilization leaves many embryos frozen in limbo, until someone wants them.

Six Seriously Spooky Cemetery Stories. Read them with the lights off, hanging on to someone you trust.

LOLcat Alignment

(via Fark)

Finnish Cough Drops



This is an ad for Zyx, a brand of cough drops sold in Finland and Sweden. You can see what’s going to happen a mile away, but it’s still pretty amusing. (via Daily Picks and Flicks)

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Good Old Mom

A Tale of Momentum and Inertia



A rock creature does what he has to do in this really short story from House Special. I love how expressive his face is; which is the exact opposite of the “stone face” you’d expect. And since it’s just animation, you can laugh without feeling guilty. (via reddit)